Whitney

Climb 4 Kidney Cancer Team Climbs Mt. Whitney for Kidney Cancer!

For Lyle Pratt-Click here to read his story!

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Did you know that a new case of kidney cancer is diagnosed about every 1.5 minutes through out the world?  That means in the time it takes you to look through this web page and read about the Climb 4 Kidney Cancer’s climb of Mt. Whitney, and read Lyle’ story, another persons life will forever be changed by the diagnosis of kidney cancer somewhere in the world?  That means if we gathered together all these people diagnosed every few minutes, during every hour, during the entire year, we would have a city the size of New Orleans of patients diagnosed with kidney cancer.  And that number keeps going up!  So we can’t waste another minute (because that is another life affected by Kidney Cancer) and decided to attempt to climb the highest peak in the continental United States, Mt. Whitney at 14,500.

Abundant snowfall this year made for beautiful pictures, but also made the climb more interesting.  We chose to ascend the Mountaineer’s route, which requires a mix of technical rock and ice climbing and to help get ready for the visit to the Alps this summer.  Lyle, you are and inspiration and give us hope that even those with advanced kidney cancer can keep on living!  Make a difference and donate today.

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Staring up from the valley nearly 11,000 feet below it almost seems impossible that anyone could ever stand atop that imposing mountain, let alone us!
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We started off all smiles, not exactly sure how hard this was going to be
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The weather was fine and we could see our goal in the distance
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After hours of hiking and lugging up our packs with all our gear, we arrived at Upper Boy Scout Lake
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We pitched our tent and had a spectacular view of the stars in an open cathedral of soaring granite and ice, with a view of Lone Pine far away in the valley below
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We rose at 415 am and started hiking by 5 am. The early morning sun bathed the east facing mountain creating a glowing effect called Alpenglow. It also created a stillness and long shadows that felt lonely
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We felt small and insignificant as we marched towards the upper portion of the mountain
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With the summit in full view, we traversed the slope up and into the basin were Iceberg lake rests
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The granite was so light the sky almost looks black in the early morning. We point to our goal, now almost within reach
We start up the infamous couloir.  This interminable run of snow rises for nearly 1700 feet
We start up the infamous couloir. This interminable run of snow rises for nearly 1700 feet
At first we were upright
At first we were upright
Then had to use all fours!
Then had to use all fours!
Towards the end as exhaustion from the sheer physical effort, the altitude and the fitful sleep, we ended up in this position every 15-20 steps
Towards the end as exhaustion from the sheer physical effort, the altitude and the fitful sleep, we ended up in this position every 15-20 steps
We made it to the notch and got a burst of energy when we could finally see the summit above the last 400 feet
We made it to the notch and got a burst of energy when we could finally see the summit above the last 400 feet
Once on top, the view was spectacular!  It was hard to believe we were in Lone Pine, just over 24 hours ago
Once on top, the view was spectacular! It was hard to believe we were in Lone Pine, just over 24 hours ago
We pulled out the Climb 4 Kidney Cancer shirt on the summit to celebrate with Lyle 12 years fighting Kidney Cancer, Way to go Lyle!
We pulled out the Climb 4 Kidney Cancer shirt on the summit to celebrate with Lyle, 12 years fighting Kidney Cancer, Way to go Lyle!

 

Register to climb Minnesota’s biggest mountain Sept 17th, 2016

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